Wednesday, February 08, 2006

Premieres of Rihm, Rommereim and Harman in New York

From The New Yorker

NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
Maazel is no latecomer to the cause of Elliott Carter: he conducted the first Philharmonic performance of the composer’s Variations for Orchestra (1955) back in 1972. He leads the work once more as part of a sprightly program that includes Brahms’s “Haydn Variations,” Kodály’s “Dances of Galánta,” and Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G Minor (with Gil Shaham). (Feb. 16 at 7:30, Feb. 17 at 11 a.m., and Feb. 18 at 8.) (Avery Fisher Hall. 212-875-5656.)

JUILLIARD SYMPHONY
An ear-stretching program of Bernstein (the Symphony No. 2, “The Age of Anxiety”), Debussy, Schoenberg (the Prelude to “Gurrelieder,” arranged for chamber forces by Huang Ruo), and Varèse (the humorous “Tuning Up” and the visionary “Amériques”), all conducted by James Conlon. (Avery Fisher Hall. 212-721-6500. Feb. 15 at 8.)

OSVALDO GOLIJOV’S “LA PASIÓN SEGÚN SAN MARCOS”
This tumultuous work, a setting of the Passion of St. Mark that includes raucous Afro-Caribbean rhythms throughout and a haunting Hebraic Kaddish at the close, rocketed its composer to worldwide fame—and it must be heard. Robert Spano conducts the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and the Schola Cantorum de Caracas. (Rose Theatre, Broadway at 60th St. 212-721-6500. Feb. 20-21 at 8.)

CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
Feb. 8 at 7:30: The society joins in the Osvaldo Golijov festival by presenting the clarinettist Todd Palmer and the St. Lawrence String Quartet—longtime advocates for the composer’s music—in performances of “Yiddishbbuk” and “The Dreams and Prayers of Isaac the Blind”; the cellist David Finckel joins the St. Lawrence for Schubert’s Quintet in C Major. (Alice Tully Hall.) Feb. 16 at 6:45: More new music is offered on the latest “Double Exposure” concert, two performances of works by Keith Fitch, Anthony Gatto (“The Sheltering Sky”), and David Rakowski with refreshments offered in between. The performers include the cellist Clancy Newman and the clarinettist Alexander Fiterstein. (Rose Studio, Rose Building.) (212-875-5788.)

THOMAS MEGLIORANZA
The young baritone—a winner of the Concert Artists Guild competition, and an impressive advocate for English-language art song—offers a concert of vocal works by such composers as Milton Babbitt, Aaron Jay Kernis, Russell Platt, and John Rommereim (a première). (Symphony Space, Broadway at 95th St. 212-864-5400. Feb. 9 at 7:30.)

“MAKING MUSIC: STEVEN MACKEY”
When this Princeton composer was beginning his career, writing music influenced by rock and pop was heresy; now it’s commonplace. The Prism Saxophone Quartet and the Brentano String Quartet—along with the composer, on electric guitar—will show why Mackey does it as well as anyone, with a selection of his works. (Zankel Hall. 212-247-7800. Feb. 9 at 7:30.)

MUSIC FROM JAPAN FESTIVAL 2006
Feb. 11 at 8: The annual festival, a window on a culture at once modern and profoundly traditional, begins with a recital by the acclaimed shakuhachi virtuoso Akikazu Nakamura. Feb. 12 at 2: Nakamura is joined by a clutch of New York’s best new-music pros (featuring the pianist Stephen Gosling and the violinist Tom Chiu) for an afternoon of works by five young Japanese composers. (Merkin Concert Hall, 129 W. 67th St. 212-501-3330.)

ALARM WILL SOUND
The intriguing young group offers the world première of Wolfgang Rihm’s “Will Sound” along with works by Zappa, Varèse, Cage, and John Cale. (Zankel Hall. 212-247-7800. Feb. 16 at 7:30.)

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM ARTISTS IN CONCERT
The exciting young ensemble, headed by the cellist Edward Arron, combines repertory favorites (including Dvorák’s Bagatelles, Op. 47, and Schumann’s Piano Quartet) with daring novelties (Schnittke’s String Quartet No. 3 and Kancheli’s “Rag-Gidon-Time,” for string trio). (Fifth Ave. at 83rd St. 212-570-3949. Feb. 17 at 8. For full schedule, see www.metmuseum.org.)

“IN YOUR EAR TOO”
Three seasoned new-music pros—the pianist Nicolas Hodges, the violinist Geoff Nuttall, and the clarinettist Derek Bermel—perform a mix of music new (by Birtwistle, Bermel, and a world-première work by Chris Paul Harman) and old (by Beethoven, Bartók, and Stravinsky). (Zankel Hall. 212-247-7800. Feb. 19 at 3. For full schedule, see www.carnegiehall.org.)

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